YouTube gives live streaming an upgrade: As live streaming videos become increasingly popular, YouTube has made strides to offer their members a better, "ultra-low latency" setting that ensures the feed is reaching their viewers in real time. As Mashable reported, previously streamers had latency times as high as ten seconds, and YouTubes new setting cuts that time to just a couple of seconds. Although this new ability to stream faster comes with the tradeoff of more buffering time for viewers, updates like these make it clear that the trend of live videos isn't going anywhere anytime soon. 

Instagram hack exposed information from as many as six million accounts: Last week Instagram announced that a bug in their system had exposed contact information for some of their users. Although Instagram reps originally claimed this bug had only affected verified accounts, they've since admitted non-verified users had been targeted as well. The Verge has reported that hours after the hack was announced, the perpetrators offered a searchable database (Doxagram), allowing people to search for victims' contact information at $10 per search. While they didn't get access to passwords, some hackers were able to use social engineering to gain entry to accounts. Instagram is now working with law enforcement to investigate which accounts were affected, and combat the sale of stolen information. 

Facebook announces a new video streaming service: Continuing its path to transition the content on their platform from text to video, Facebook has rolled out a new video streaming service. Called "Facebook Watch," it can be accessed from the homepage feed, and features a huge range of shows, including a few originals (no doubt attempting to follow in Netflix's footsteps).

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